The People

Statistics Canada on Canadian Demographics for 2015

Canada is among the top-10 countries with the largest foreign-born population

http://www.statcan.gc.ca/pub/91-003-x/2014001/section03/30t3n-eng.htm

  • Among the countries of the world with the largest foreign-born populations, Canada is currently ranked eighth, with about 7.5 million people. The size of the foreign-born population in Canada closely follows that of the United Arab Emirates, the United Kingdom and France.
  • The United States is in the first position, with a foreign-born population estimated at 45.8 million people, however, the population of the United States is approximately 330 million compared to a population in Canada of about 35 million. So the foreign born population in Canada is over 20% of our total population while that of the United States is over 13% of the total population.
  • The Russian Federation and Germany were ranked in the second and third position, in terms of the size of their foreign-born populations.
Table 3
Foreign-born population by selected countries, recent period
Table summary
This table displays the results of Foreign-born population by selected countries. The information is grouped by Rank (appearing as row headers), Country and Foreign-born population, calculated using in millions units of measure (appearing as column headers).
Rank Country Foreign-born population
in millions
1 United States 45.8
2 Russian Federation 11.1
3 Germany 9.9
4 Saudi Arabia 9.1
5 United Arab Emirates 7.8
6 United Kingdom 7.8
7 France 7.6
8 Canada 7.5
9 Australia 6.5
10 Spain 6.5

Linguistic diversity in Canada

http://www12.statcan.gc.ca/census-recensement/2011/as-sa/98-314-x/98-314-x2011001-eng.cfm

  • More than 200 languages were reported in the 2011 Census of Population as a home language or mother tongue.
  • The number of persons who reported speaking Tagalog, a Philippine-based language, most often at home increased the most (+64%) between 2006 and 2011. Nearly 279,000 persons reported speaking this language at home, compared with 170,000 in 2006.
  • In 2011, 80% of the population who reported speaking an immigrant language (i.e., a language other than English, French or an Aboriginal language) most often at home lived in one of Canada’s six largest census metropolitan areas.

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